Boxing Bag Gloves – Small and Deadly!

by Fran on August 19, 2010

Boxing bag gloves tend to go up to 10oz to 12oz in weight and are available in a range of colours to suit any taste.  Bag gloves are in the main the cheapest type of boxing glove available.  Bag glove options have moved on significantly over the years from the traditional style bag glove that has no wristband and very compact, thin padding.  Also available now are a range of hybrid gloves that take design elements from the competition glove range and combine these with the characteristics of the traditional bag glove.

The common characteristic across the range of boxing bag gloves tends to be a reduced level of padding in the knuckle area.  The reduced level of padding really allows the boxer to ‘feel’ the impact of the shots, very important for self-confidence purposes.  However, boxing bag gloves are entirely unsuitable for use during any kind of contact activity, namely sparring, so don't start hitting anyone in the head!  The reduced level of padding also means that it is critical that effective hand protection (in the form of bandages or hand wraps) is used.

When choosing bag gloves, go with a pair from one of the main suppliers such as Everlast, Lonsdale or BBE.  These companies have been designing and manufacturing boxing gloves for many decades, and I've yet to find a pair produced with any particular design deficiency.  This said, there is a considerable personal preference aspect in terms of the feel of the glove and as such there is some trial and error involved.  I for instance dislike those bag gloves that for some reason have the thumb removed, I just don't get it!

Finally, having bought a pair of boxing bag gloves, it's vital that you give yourself time to settle in with them.  Aim to complete at least about 50 rounds of bag work before you decide whether they are for you.

Anyway, here are some products in which you might be interested:

Boxing Bag Gloves:

Hybrid Boxing Gloves:

Be aware that some of the gloves below are marketed as sparring gloves. I would not allow a spar to take place using these gloves, so I think that they are hybrid/general training gloves.

I hope this has helped, be sure to leave a comment.  Click here for more top advice on boxing fitness and boxing skills, or go here to find out about all the boxing gloves available.


Something else, the links on this page are affiliate links. This means that if you click on the link and subsequently make a purchase, then I get paid a small commission. You need to be aware of this. Also, the links on this page represent what I would buy if I were buying. I have not tried the specific piece of equipment and as such cannot directly recommend it. However, if I were buying, these are the selections that I would make.

Cheers

Fran

The final type of glove I will cover is the bag glove or bag mitt. Bag mitts tend to go up to 10oz to 12oz in weight and are available in a range of colours that will suit any taste. Bag mitt options have moved on significantly over the years from the traditional style bag mitt (left) to now cover a range of hybrid gloves that take design elements from the competition glove range and combine these with the characteristics of the traditional bag mitt.

The common characteristic across the range of bag mitts tends to be a reduced level of padding in the knuckle area. The reduced level of padding in the knuckle area really allows you to ‘feel’ the impact of the shots, very important for self-confidence purposes. Remember, as explained in the previous section effective bandaging/wrapping of the hands is the primary method of preventing injury, so don’t compromise, especially when using thinner gloves like bag mitts!

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{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

Peter_S February 5, 2013 at 10:48 pm

Hey Fran! I hope this message finds you, as I see this article is quite old and am unsure how your alert systems operate.

I was wondering whether or not training on the heavy bag with 16 oz sparring gloves is at all suitable? From the sound of it, bag gloves that are this light and this thin are a matter of preference for you.

Reply

Fran February 8, 2013 at 8:00 pm

That’s right Peter, it’s purely personal preference. If I was recovering from a hand injury for instance, then I’d use big gloves all the way.

Reply

rajesh singh March 27, 2012 at 6:56 am

I haven’t found a single video where you have combined footwork along with jab or cross. Please do so, i’m in urgent need of it. I have no one else to fall back on.

Thank you.

Reply

Fran March 27, 2012 at 9:38 am

Sign up to the free videos Rajesh, you’ll get some insights there.

Reply

Chris January 19, 2012 at 8:45 pm

Thanks Fran
Good practical advice for the novice like myself.Great site as well,all questions that have arisen so far I have been able to find answers to quickly.Indispensable for the beginner and this sort of attention to detail and safety is great.

Cheers

Chris

Reply

Fran January 20, 2012 at 8:01 am

Good stuff mate. Don’t forget, anything you can’t find just let me know.

Reply

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