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Southpaw & Orthodox Basics…Quickly!
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Southpaw & Orthodox Basics…Quickly!

by Fran on February 28, 2016

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The contradiction of the opposing stances in boxing is something that I have always found fascinating. The subtle differences between a southpaw (left-hander) facing an orthodox (right-hander) often cause confusion, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

In this video and article I am going to offer some very simple guidance on how to apply some tactics to effectively manage an opponent with an opposing stance.

Regardless of whether you are a southpaw boxer or an orthodox boxer the content of this video will really help.

There is a ton of stuff that the southpaw versus orthodox encounter drives out. We can sometimes though be guilty of over-analysing the situation. To keep things nice and simple, I like to think of the encounter in terms of ‘safe zones’.

The safe zone is simply the place where the opponent with an opposing stance can land the fewest meaningful shots.

If you are an orthodox boxer facing a southpaw boxer, your safe zone is to your left. This means that you are staying away from the power left hand (back hand) of your southpaw opponent. It is also very difficult for the southpaw boxer to connect with a properly leveraged lead hand hook when you are in the safe zone.

The same is then true if you are a southpaw boxer facing an orthodox boxer, only in reverse. You as a southpaw boxer must dominate the ground to your right, thus moving away from the power back hand of the orthodox boxer.

You can see then that there is a battle to hold the same ground at the same time for the same purpose. The key is to apply tactics that allow you to get your lead foot ‘outside’ that of your opponent. You gain the safe zone and keep them in the strike zone.

If you are going to move the opposite way, away from the safe zone, do so whilst moving ever so slightly back at the same time. This will mean that any back hand coming your way should, hopefully, fall short and you can push in to land your own power back hand.

There is much more we could discuss, but even trying to stick to 90 seconds to explain this simple principle I ended up taking 114 seconds…I’m getting sloppy.

Cheers

Fran

 

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{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Kenny March 3, 2016 at 6:43 pm

Yes Fran, thanks. I can indeed see where you’re coming from now.

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Kenny March 3, 2016 at 6:47 pm

Ignore please. posted in wrong place!

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mark March 1, 2016 at 8:13 pm

Hi Fran very good video , very nice explanation on winning the safe ground, Im a big fan of Vasyl Lomachenko and he really does try at every opportunity to get around his opponent outside the left shoulder ( of an othordox), he also does what i can only really call a push pivot where he kind of pivots off his opponent by keeping his arm in after his last punch and pushes off from it with a pivot or a short step this seems to be very effective and gives him some fantastic angles. Hope you are well keep up the good work mate
Regards Mark

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Fran March 2, 2016 at 8:42 pm

Brilliant

Thanks Mark, I wanted to see whether anyone came up with Lomachenko as a perfect example of executing this tactic – he constantly shifts to the safe zone and is the ultimate expert at it. One of my fellow coaches visiting the site comes up trumps again 🙂

I’m all good, I hope that all us well with you and the gym.

Cheers

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Jim mcallister March 1, 2016 at 7:43 am

Iv listened and taken on bourd all of your tips,very good

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Fran March 2, 2016 at 8:35 pm

Hey Jim

Wow, really flattered that someone of your background and skills is even taking the time to watch my vids, let alone practice them! You’ve made my week Jim, thanks for taking the time out to watch and comment, I appreciate it.

PS – Really like your site and vids, just watched a couple of them!

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Kenny February 29, 2016 at 7:40 pm

Nice video Fran. Taking me as an orthodox boxer against a southpaw, I can see why I wouldn’t want to move to my right and into the southpaw’s backhand. But if I move to my left instead am I not just walking into the southpaw’s leadhand hook? Sorry, I see you’ve referred to it briefly above but I still can’t quite see why it’s any less of a danger to move left rather than right. Thanks.

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Fran March 2, 2016 at 8:28 pm

Thanks for the question Kenny. It’s really about the fact that moving to your left means that your head is in a more narrow strike zone. That is to say that a southpaw back hand can do more damage across a wider strike zone whereas the lead hand loses it’s power pretty quickly as you move to your left. Hope this makes sense?

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Kenny March 3, 2016 at 6:44 pm

Yes Fran, thanks. I can indeed see where you’re coming from now.

P.s. Sorry for duplicate posting at the top by mistake!

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